♠️♥️♣️DI, Why Bridges?♣️♥️♠️

Welcome back ladies and germs. I usually have a more creative intro but I think it’s necessary to welcome every single organism out there, including coved-19. All coronavirus  jokes aside, welcome to yet another DI portfolio post. Destination Imagination has been quite the rollercoaster this year. As the process has had me up and down for months I haven’t had much time to reflect, so here we are!  To read all about DI and my experience with it last year click here! Anyway, as I previously said, DI has been all over the place this year and if I’m being 100% honest, it has been nothing even remotely comparable to my challenge solution last year. That being said, I’m going to take this post in an abnormal direction, one that is more subjective to my experience this time around!

When my group was first brought together, I will admit I was anything but excited. Obviously I had a bit of a rock brain going in and as soon as I recognized that, I changed my views and tried to connect and collaborate with my teammates. As we’ve gone on I soon recognized the assets that each of us brought to the table. Skipping ahead a few weeks and there is still some conflict between team members but we have come a long way, especially considering our group dynamics. Being the only girl in my group of five did admittedly feel intimidating at first, which is very abnormal for me. But I realized that I was put in a situation that was going to be challenging because of that group dynamic and even more so due to the challenge we selected. Engineering involves math and science more than anything else. That alone made me uncomfortable because I’m not someone who can easily understand challenge requirements that are all about measurements, weights and efficiency ratio’s. The recognize portion of this project wasn’t just about learning the challenge requirements, or understanding the scoring this. Instead it was a mix of both understanding the challenge in full, finding ways to work peacefully with my group, and most of all step outside my comfort zone. Now almost two months after we started, I can see that I achieved in understanding my challenge and collaborating with my team. It was the fact that I failed to take risks that weighed me down.

Thinking in the most creative ways possible is what allows for success in DI. That along with a strong sense of teamwork, intuition, and leadership are what make for a great DI solution. In our initial team com react, we out each of those thing down and committed to achieving each of them. Overall our challenge solution is strong in some areas, just not the ones that will put us on top. As a group we completely failed in communicating and appointing a leader. All of the work would pile onto one person at a time and left us very divided. Leading up to provincials I’m striving for a first place trophy that we deserve. Whether that is for our challenges overall success or the success of our team really matters to me this time. I want to take risks and step outside of my comfort zone and into the topics and concepts that I’m not as strong with. While I did contribute to the solution in writing our story and working with the set, I didn’t do enough with our bridge and load. Provincials is only a few weeks away and I am determined to not let anything, whether that be my teammates, time management, or my own thoughts get in my way. We have come together as a group and discussed all that needs to be done in order to succeed. We need to allow for everyone’s voices to be heard and I cannot express enough how much we need to practice and prepare. Improvised acting and superstitions aren’t going to get us to where we want to be. Practice makes perfect and we were nowhere near perfect at regionals. For provincials I honestly think that we should edit our contract. We need to practice better communication between DRI’s. We need to practice better teamwork with preferably much less conflict. And finally we need to have every team member put in the same amount of effort in order to succeed. 

Over the past week or so, and into spring break and the return to school after, I plan to work hard on the parts of our solution that need help. Our set piece is going to be flawless and our bridge will be much more reliable than the last. I’m going to be able to put the bridge together even if it’s not my part in the actual performance. My determination is there this time around and I’m fired up for the next tournament!

Thanks again for coming to my TED Talk: Quarantine Edition!

✌️Ciara 

🩺🩸The CSICU || A Day in The Life🩸🩺

DarkoStojanovic / Pixabay

Hey guys! Welcome back for another PGP related post! Yes this is in fact the highly anticipated post all about take your kid to work day. I was so excited for this entire experience and the project that went along with the activities was entirely enjoyable. I know that probably sounded rather sarcastic depending on how you read it but in all honesty I enjoyed the whole process. So what exactly is take your kid to work day? Every year since 1994 take your kid to work day has been a huge part of career education in secondary schools across Canada. The day, this year on November 6th, entails students going to their parents or family members workplace and shadowing them in a days work. I was lucky enough to accompany my aunt for the day at the Royal Columbia Hospital where she works as a CSICU nurse. My real challenge was to create a video and write an outstanding post about my expertise all the while answering some very important questions that we’ll get to soon enough.

    My day stared off way to early. I identify as a night owl and definitely not an early bird. Getting up before 6am did not appeal to me but as I was challenging myself to really try to live like a hospital employee for the day, I had to suck it up and somehow stay awake for the entire day. Arriving at the hospital was really fun because I got to put on a set of scrubs and walk into the CSICU for the first time. Incase you were wondering, CSICU stands for cardio surgery intensive care unit and it’s basically where all cardio surgery patients go to recover before being transferred to the general ward. At first being there was a little overwhelming but after I started to feel comfortable I turned right back into myself and began asking many, many questions. Next up was a hospital tour in which I saw some of the bigger departments that make the hospital run as smoothly as it does. In doing so I started to think about how the way people represent themselves within the workplace affects the way the hospital runs altogether. When we went through Respiratory Therapy, our RT presenter talked about how she thought RT’s were represented in the hospital. She mentioned that employees from other wards sometimes think of them as the firefighters of the hospital. They are there to monitor the breathing of each patient and they swoop in whenever goes wrong and evidently save the day. I started to wonder how the other parts of the hospital saw themselves and how the defined the contribution they made to the wellbeing of their patients. 

   Later on I asked my aunt about the rules revolving around confidentiality and liability and due to the strict rules I was not allowed to get any recordings of an any employees. This threw one heck of a wrench into my plans, especially considering that I needed to get an interview for my video. But coming prepared was an important piece of this project so I ran an alternative interview with a cardio surgeon from my aunts department.

In the interview I posed th question, “how do you think the different roles throughout the hospital impact the needs of the patients and the community?” His response was certainly a great way of representing his thoughts on the subject. “I believe that a hospital, like this one runs like a machine. Without all its parts and bits and pieces it can’t operate smoothly. If we didn’t have the lab, we couldn’t identify the problem. Without the doctors and nurses in their respective specialities we can’t fix those problems. And without the nurses, like your aunt, we couldn’t help our patients recover in full. For the impact on the community part, I guess you could say that the patients, the people that we treat are a part of our community and the impacts we have on their lives, have a kind of ripple effect.” My next question was referring to his decision to continue on the path of becoming a cardiovascular surgeon. I asked, “did you come into this specific field of medicine due to personal passion or another driving force?” He once again, had a strong response. “Well, in the beginning it was all a personal decision but once I reached the end of my residency I’d stared a family and I think that played a role in my choice to continue in surgery. Going into cardio was more or less based on  what I was good at and how much I enjoyed it.”

sasint / Pixabay

Shadowing my aunt was one thing, and it was really interesting to see what a day in the CSICU looks like but the real outcome of the experience was the insight on the working parts of any workplace. I learned from seeing the behind the scenes parts of the hospital that each and every department plays a role in every single patients care and wellbeing. I learned a lot from my interview with the cardio surgeon, who I was honoured to call Dr. Bob. (Yes that is what his co-workers call him). Later on while I was beginning to structure my video I came to the conclusion that it is the roles that every employee within a workplace plays that go towards the overall success of the business, company, or facility. A hospital could not run without the lab pathologists, OR nurses, or first responders and just like any other workplace it’s the way that those who do each job see themselves that makes an even larger impact.

Thanks for coming to my TED Talk

✌️Ciara