Screenplay

OPENING SCENE

(DRONE SHOT OF FOREST WITH TITLE OF MOVIE OVERLAID)

Cut to footage of trees (WORM’S EYE VIEW)

NARRATOR (V.O.)

When you think of rainforests, you probably think of the tropical rainforests of the amazon, filled with poison dart frogs and colourful but deadly plants.

(SKETCH OF AMAZON RIVER)

The Temperate Rainforest is quite like the typical tropical rainforest, but the temperate rainforests are located closer to the poles instead of at the equator.

BC’s temperate rainforests are lush with moss, fungi, and trees that tower over everything else

(FOOTAGE OF DEER FERN)

Here is the Deer Fern

The fern may seem very uninteresting, but it actually is the oldest known plant to ever exist

The Deer Fern has fibrous roots that allow it to collect water and nutrients with ease, which is why you see it everywhere.

(FOOTAGE OF PILEATED WOODPECKER)

The loud Pileated woodpecker can puncture through tough bark to eat the ants and other various bugs hiding in the tree

The pileated woodpecker has a wingspan of up to 77 cm

Now that we’ve seen the creatures that thrive at the top of the forest, let’s look at some a little closer to the ground.

(PANS FROM WORMS EYE VIEW TO BIRDS EYE VIEW)

(SHOW GARTER SNAKE)

This is the Common Garter Snake. This creature lives 

(ROTATING SHOT OF DOUGLAS FIR) 

This is a Douglas Fir

These trees are one of the tallest species of tree in the world. The Douglas Fir can grow to over 85 meters tall.

(SHIFT TO DRONE VIEW)

This fir tree is a living ecosystem, with moss thriving off the branches, squirrels and birds using the tree as their home, and various bugs living off of the nutrients that the tree pulls from the soil.

Even when the tree dies, termites and ants take shelter within the corpse of the great tree. Sometimes other trees grow out from the deceased plant, consuming the leftover nutrients and using it to grow.

Although these trees are majestic, they face massive threats from logging and deforestation. About 15 billion trees are cut down every year, and 42 million every day. That’s not even the only threat to these forest giants. Invasive species that are not native to BC take up valuable soil, water, and sunlight which could be used instead for the growth of the forests.

(Interview Portion)

Help protect these sacred forests. 

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